Annual Meeting Registration

Details for the Annual Conference Registration & Membership Application

Anyone who plans on attending the annual conference may use the online registration form, regardless of whether you are or wish to be an ASTE member.

Your order may be paid online through PayPal or using a credit card. Online processing is immediate and a detailed receipt of your payment will be emailed to you. Payment can also be made through postal mail using a check, money order or credit card. The processing time through postal mail is approximately two weeks.

If you wish to pay for membership and conference registration separately (e.g., you pay membership and your institution pays for conference registration), you must go through the online form twice. First go through the online form and complete only the membership portion of the order form.  After payment is received you will receive an email receipt (This is immediate when paying online, two weeks through postal mail). Next, log back into the online form and complete the conference registration portion of the order form.  The system will know that you have already paid to be a 2023 ASTE member and will have you register for the conference at the discounted membership rate.

Questions? Email Dr. Kate Popejoy, ASTE Executive Director, at executivedirector@theaste.org

Registration Rates

Member Rates

  • In-Person Conference
    • Early Bird: $300 – Deadline: 11/15/2022
    • Pre-registration: $325 – Deadline: 11/30/2022
    • On-site: $375
    • Single Day: $185 (Does not include meals)
  • Virtual Conference
    • Early Bird: $100 – Deadline: 11/15/2022
    • Pre-registration: $150 – Deadline: 11/30/2022
    • Day-of: $250

*Spouse rates are the same as member rates. Please contact the Executive Director about registering a spouse.

Student, PK-12 Teacher, and Future Teacher Member Rates

  • In-Person Conference
    • Early Bird: $150 – Deadline: 11/15/2022
    • Pre-registration: $165 – Deadline: 11/30/2022
    • On-site: $200
    • Single Day: $185 (Does not include meals)
  • Virtual Conference
    • Early Bird: $100 – Deadline: 11/15/2022
    • Pre-registration: $150 – Deadline: 11/30/2022
    • Day-of: $250

Non-Member Rates

  • In-Person Conference
    • Early Bird: $425 – Deadline: 11/15/2022
    • Pre-registration: $450 – Deadline: 11/30/2022
    • On-site: $475
    • Single Day: $185 (Does not include meals)
  • Virtual Conference
    • Early Bird: $235 – Deadline: 11/15/2022
    • Pre-registration: $285 – Deadline: 11/30/2022
    • Day-of: $385

2023 Covid Policy

The 2023 ASTE Salt Lake City Conference is an international event that will draw together many members of our ASTE family, some of whom are more vulnerable to COVID-19. Although there is no current mask mandate or proof of vaccination requirement from the state of Utah or Salt Lake County, we strongly recommend (but do not require) that participants wear high-quality masks (KN-95) while indoors in crowded areas, and ASTE will have high-quality masks available to participants. Also in line with the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention, we strongly recommend (but do not require) that participants be fully vaccinated. Being fully vaccinated is defined as having received a completed full primary series (two shots of the Pfizer and Moderna COVID vaccine, or one shot of the Johnson and Johnson) plus at least one booster.

ASTE will also employ other measures to keep each other safe during this gathering:

  • Large spaces for eating to allow for physical spacing in the conference hotel
  • Virtual options for large group gatherings so that vulnerable members can watch from their rooms to minimize risks
  • Hand sanitizer stations throughout the venue.

The ASTE leadership will reevaluate the COVID situation and make needed policy changes according to CDC guidelines closer to the conference date

Conference Events

Pre-Conference Field Experience and Workshop

Wednesday, January 11 8:00a – 6:00p
Title: The Geoscience Perspective on Climate Change in Utah: Evidence from Lakes and Glaciers
Facilitators: Larry Krissek, Tamara Peffer, & Steve Kerlin
Sponsors: Pennsylvania Department of EducationStroud Water Research Center, and Utah State University Smart Foodscapes (USDA-NIFA # 2021-69012-35952)
Limited to 28 ASTE Members

Cost $35
Includes: transportation, field experience, museum admission, workshop, materials, and lunch
Does not include: snacks, water

Overview: Utah’s geology and geography provide tremendous scenic beauty, but also carry records of major climatic changes over timescales of thousands to millions of years.  This field experience will visit several localities in the Salt Lake City area where evidence of these climatic changes can be observed, with an emphasis on the climate records produced by glaciers and large internally drained lakes (i.e., lakes without an outflowing river, such as the present Great Salt Lake).   The focus of this field experience on the geological record of past climate links closely with the topic of the conference keynote address by Dr. Lawrence Krissek and with his workshop on “thinking like a geologist.” The water workshop at the museum, led by Tamara Peffer and Dr. Steve Kerlin, will explore and compare potential impacts and interactions between natural salts and human-applied treatment on stream life and other biota.

The field experience, sponsored by Utah State University Smart Foodscapes (USDA-NIFA # 2021-69012-35952), is divided into a morning portion and an afternoon portion.  One of the two major stops in the morning portion and the stop for the afternoon portion of the field experience are inside ADA-compliant buildings; the other morning stop is outdoors, and requires <100 m of walking on a flat paved sidewalk. Restrooms are available throughout the field experience and workshop. Dress warmly and bring water and or snacks. Lunch will be provided at the museum.

The morning portion of the field experience will have two major stops, with the potential for several additional brief stops if time and weather allow.  The first stop will be at the Utah Geological Survey’s Utah Core Research Center where we will examine rock cores drilled from the Eocene (~55-43 million years ago) Green River Formation in northeastern Utah.  The Green River Formation was deposited in the ancient Lake Uinta, which has been interpreted as having many of the same characteristics as the modern Great Salt Lake.  In both cases, the lakes had internal drainage, meaning that they lacked a major outflowing river; as a result, the volume and the chemistry of water in the lake was controlled by the relative amounts of precipitation and evaporation, making the lake and its sediments an excellent recorder of climatic conditions in the lake basin.  We will learn how to recognize and interpret this story of past climates from the cores examined.

The second major morning stop will be at the G.K. Gilbert Geologic View Park in Sandy, UT, at the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon. At this park a short walk on a flat paved sidewalk allows views of a variety of geologic features: 1) bedrock in the canyon that ranges from 1.7 billion to 31 million years old; 2) a classic U-shaped valley carved by glaciers within the last 100,000 years; 3) the highest elevation shoreline formed by Lake Bonneville, an expanded version of the Great Salt Lake, approximately 18,000 years ago; and 4) evidence of multiple movements on the Wasatch Fault during the last 10,000 years.

If time and weather allow, the morning portion of the field experience will conclude with stops at the Temple Granite Quarry Historical Monument in Little Cottonwood Canyon (including an optional 0.4 mile walk on a paved path) and at two other locations between Little Cottonwood and Big Cottonwood Canyons to see Lake Bonneville shorelines and sediments.

The afternoon portion of the field experience and the water workshop will consist of a visit to the Natural History Museum of Utah. Admission, lunch, and water workshop will be provided by sponsors, Pennsylvania Department of Education and Stroud Water Research Center.

During the water workshop, led by Tamara Peffer and Steve Kerlin, participants will analyze the chemical composition of the water samples. Using additional tools such as WikiWatershed, we will explore and compare potential impacts and interactions between natural salts and human-applied treatment on stream life and other biota. From this point, we work to frame our observations and potential inquiry and action using the Environmental Literacy Model.

After the workshop, we have two curated experiences in the museum led by Larry Krissek. Our group discussions will focus on the exhibits of the Great Salt Lake and its immediate predecessors (e.g., Lake Bonneville) and of the Green River Formation and participate in the water workshop.  Exhibits of sediment cores taken from the Great Salt Lake illustrate climatically driven variations in lake extent and lake chemistry similar to those seen during the morning in the Green River Formation cores.  In addition to its sedimentary record of past climates, the Green River Formation exhibit at the NHMU also shows excellent examples of exquisitely preserved fauna (e.g, fish, insects) and flora, which themselves carry information about past climates.

After our group visits to the Great Salt Lake and Green River Formation exhibits, participants will have time to explore the remainder of the NHMU on their own.  Vans will leave for the conference hotel at approximately 5:30 p.m.  However, the museum stays open until 9 p.m. on Wednesdays, so those wishing to stay longer can do so and make their own way back to the conference hotel.

Post-Conference Field Experience and Workshop

Sunday, January 15 8:00a – 1:00p
Title: Remix: The Geoscience Perspective on Climate Change in Utah: Evidence from Lakes and Glaciers
Facilitators: Larry Krissek
Sponsors: Utah State University Smart Foodscapes (USDA-NIFA # 2021-69012-35952)
Limited to 14 ASTE Members

Cost $25
Includes: transportation, field experience, museum admission
Does not include: snacks, water, lunch

Tentative Itinerary

8:00 AM Meet at hotel lobby and travel by van to G.K. Gilbert Geologic View Park in Sandy, UT, at the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon

10:00 AM – 11:30 PM Curation of Great Salt Lake and Green River Formation exhibits at Natural History Museum of Utah

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM Tour the Museum on your own

1:15 PM Vans return to hotel OR you can stay until the museum closes at 5:00 PM but you will need to find your own way back to the hotel

Overview:
Utah’s geology and geography provide tremendous scenic beauty, but also carry records of major climatic changes over timescales of thousands to millions of years. This fieldtrip will visit several localities in the Salt Lake City area where evidence of these climatic changes can be observed, with an emphasis on the climate records produced by glaciers and large internally drained lakes (i.e., lakes without an outflowing river, such as the present Great Salt Lake). The focus of this fieldtrip on the geological record of past climate links closely with the topic of the conference keynote address and with Krissek’s workshop on “thinking like a geologist”.

The first stop requires <100 m of walking on a flat paved sidewalk, and the second portion of the fieldtrip is inside an ADA-compliant building.

First Stop:
The first stop will be at the G.K. Gilbert Geologic View Park in Sandy, UT, at the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon (see https://geology.utah.gov/map-pub/survey-notes/geosights/g-k-gilbert-geologic-view-park/). At this park a short walk on a flat paved sidewalk allows views of a variety of geologic features: 1) bedrock in the canyon that ranges from 1.7 billion to 31 million years old; 2) a classic U-shaped valley carved by glaciers within the last 100,000 years; 3) the highest elevation shoreline formed by Lake Bonneville, an expanded version of the Great Salt Lake, approximately 18,000 years ago; and 4) evidence of multiple movements on the Wasatch Fault during the last 10,000 years.

If time and weather allow, this portion of the fieldtrip will conclude with stops at the Temple Granite Quarry Historical Monument in Little Cottonwood Canyon (including an optional 0.4 mile walk on a paved path) and at two other locations between Little Cottonwood and Big Cottonwood Canyons to see
Lake Bonneville shorelines and sediments.

Second portion:
The second portion of the fieldtrip will consist of a visit to the Natural History Museum of Utah (see https://nhmu.utah.edu/) , where our group discussions will focus on the exhibits of the Great Salt Lake and its immediate predecessors (e.g., Lake Bonneville) and the Green River Formation. In addition to its sedimentary record of past climates, the Green River Formation exhibit at the NHMU also shows excellent examples of exquisitely preserved fauna (e.g, fish, insects) and flora, which themselves carry information about past climates.

After our group visits to the Great Salt Lake and Green River Formation exhibits, participants will have time to explore the remainder of the NHMU on their own. Vans will leave for the conference hotel at approximately 1 p.m. However, the museum stays open until 5 p.m. on Sundays, so those wishing to
stay longer can do so and make their own way back to the conference hotel.