Real World Computing in K20 Classrooms through NGSS

Focus:

This workshop uses the NGSS as a frame to understand Scientific Method, Engineering Design, Computer Science and Computer Engineering so that pre-service, in-service and professors/instructors have concrete examples to develop, use, and extend in their classrooms.

Learning Objectives:

Participants will be able to:
1. Differentiate between scientific method and engineering design;
2. Differentiate between Computer Science and Computer Engineering;
3. Explain and use examples of engineering design, Computer Science and Computer Engineering;
4. Create classroom demonstrations, activities, lessons (etc) using engineering design, Computer Science and Computer Engineering

Evaluation Strategy:

Fundamentally, our learning objectives are directly tied to our evaluation strategy. Of greatest importance is the foundational importance is knowledge of the scientific method and engineering design – in the context of the workshop we aim to see increased knowledge in the distinction between computing disciplines. The penultimate goal is to have participants capable of creating and using content in their classroom.

Evaluation Plan:

Participants will be given three assessments during the duration of the workshop/academic year consisting of:
• NGSS, computing and STEM knowledge based questions
• Likert-scale questions to build base-line perceptions on NGSS/STEM self-leveling
• Open-response questions to gauge current NGSS/STEM integration implementation practices

The assessment will be given prior to and immediately following the workshop session. Based on responses following the workshop, the two leaders will devise a custom tailored strategy for 8 follow-up sessions. A final (third) assessment will be administered online at the end of the academic year.

Instructional Strategies:

The presenters of this workshop believe in ‘practicing what they teach’ – as such the workshop is modeled as an engaged, active-learning, inquiry-heavy workshop with focus on cross-cutting concepts. We will model a typical inquiry lesson – providing pre/post assessments, catches, minimal scaffolding, heavy activity and exploration, reconnection, development and final Q&A to drive a meaningful experience for participants while building upon and valuing their prior experiences an knowledge.

When aligned to the learning objectives the instructional strategies employed allow participants to discover through scaffolding differences in methods & computing (#1,#2), and have hand-on experiences (#3,#4) though the active learning segments listed in the outline below.

Outline (Sequence & Duration):
While our current workshop session can be tailored to a 2-hour block – based on prior experiences – participants have a greater opportunity to explore Computing-based activities when given supplemental scaffolding time. As such – we propose two plans (for 3 hours and 2 hour, respectively).

2-Hour Session Plan

15m Intro through Immersion – Starter Activity – Problem Solving isn’t rigid
10m NGSS ‘review’ – Instances of Engineering Skills, Crosscutting Concepts
15m Relating NGSS to intro activity – ‘scientific method’ vs. engineering design
25m Hands-on Computer Science Activity (self-selected level-based projects)
10m The computing fields explained: CS versus Computer Engineering
25m Hands-on Computer Engineering Activity
20m Review; Classroom Implications and Use; Questions

3-Hour Session Plan (Allows more participant interaction with activities)

15m Intro through Immersion – Starter Activity – Problem Solving isn’t rigid
10m NGSS ‘review’ – Instances of Engineering Skills, Crosscutting Concepts
15m Relating NGSS to intro activity – ‘scientific method’ vs. engineering design
55m Hands-on Computer Science Activity (self-selected level-based projects)
10m The computing fields explained: CS versus Computer Engineering
55m Hands-on Computer Engineering Activity
20m Review; Classroom Implications and Use; Questions

Ongoing Contact (Sustainability)

The presenters are committed to a minimum of eight targeted follow-up sessions between February and May, but they will also be reachable beyond the targeted follow up sessions via email, twitter, the forum or phone.

Community:
• Monthly (Feb-May)
o Twitter Chats – First Monday of Month @ 8PM EST (datetime:tbd)
o Google Hangout – Third Thursday of Month @ 8PM EST (dt:tba)

• Cross-Collaboration with other groups
o #____EDCHATS (name/datetime:tbd)
o Google Education Groups
o NOYCE Fellow Chats (STEM professions who are in education pipeline)

• Anytime
o WEBSITE (like http://uwpd.org / http://www.ceas3.uc.edu/step )
• Forum: An asynchronous (post / reply anytime)
• Lesson Plan Sharing
• Classroom Implementation / Extension Sharing

ASTE Target Audience(s) (Interest & why)

The majority of the current ASTE audience is comprised of university science education faculty – additionally there is also an initiative to increase attendance of graduate students, pre-service and in-service teachers. What each of these groups share is use of the next generation science standards. Since the NGSS explicitly states that engineering processes and crosscutting concepts should be implemented – all groups within ASTE should have a vested interest in familiarizing themselves and learning about how to harness real world engineering / STEM connections, societal impacts and careers to frame of NGSS.

Presenter Credentials

Dr. Andrea Burrows
Andrea is an assistant professor in Secondary Science Education at the University of Wyoming. She has worked extensively with STEM pedagogy and partnerships since 1992, and since 2006 has been conducting research in those fields. She taught science in middle and high schools for 12 years in Florida and Virginia. She has authored peer-reviewed articles, presented at national/international conferences, taught undergraduate/graduate courses, and conducted professional development workshops nationally/internationally. She has recently received funding for STEM education grants from Wyoming’s Department of Education and the National Science Foundation. One of her most recent grants and associated professional developments dealt with the use of astronomy and computer science as a vehicle to get students interested in STEM content. Andrea is also a Member at Large of the American Society for Engineering Education.

Dr. Mike Borowczak
Mike is the chief scientist and founder of Erebus Labs – a Hardware Security and Engineering Outreach company located in Laramie, WY. He is also a Data Scientist at a Boulder based startup. He has worked with university faculty to promote and extend K20 STEM outreach in Ohio, Oregon, Texas and Wyoming. He also has over a decade of industry and research experience – mostly revolving around the semiconductor and bio-informatics industries – with specific experience at Texas Instruments, Intel and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. In addition to his industry experience, he has spent two years, while completing his PhD in Computer Science and Engineering, as a National Science Foundation GK-12 fellow – teaching and bring real-word STEM applications in two urban high schools. He has authored peer-reviewed articles, presented at national/international conferences, and taught undergraduate/graduate courses in Hardware Security (computer science & engineering) as well as STEM Education and Outreach. Mike is also a member of the executive committee on VLSI for the IEEE Computer Society.

Requirements:

• Budget ($0):
o Free to participants
o Optional: Bring Your Own Arduino
• Materials & Technology:
o A laptop is required to do some of the activities
o Download of several freely available tools including –
NetLogo & Arduino
• Handouts:
o Custom tailored presentations and handouts (physical and electronic)
• Intended Participant Count:
o 50 – limited for effective answering of questions and collaboration